Memorial-Decoration Day History, Schoolcraft County

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Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed on 30 May 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

The above picture shows early Memorial Day parades in Manistique.  The parades featured not only veterans from foreign wars but also the Civil War.  Several bands were part of the parades along with the Woman’s Relief Corps, Red Cross, Catholic Benevolent Association, and Daughters of Veterans.  Schoolchildren marched in formation with their teachers along with the 200-member Garden Club. Read More...

Historic Bridges of Manistique

The Red Bridge (wooden bridge) was condemned in 1890.

The Red Bridge (wooden bridge) was condemned in 1890.

The old ‘Wood Bridge’ called the Red Bridge was condemned in 1890, the ‘Iron Bridge’ was built parallel to the old wood bridge.

Once the new bridge was completed, the old wood bridge (‘Red Bridge’) became firewood.

Once the Siphon Bridge was built in 1919, the steel girders of the above bridge was used for various building projects throughout the county.

The iconic Siphon Bridge was built across the Manistique River in 1919 by the Manistique Pulp and Paper Company, which was owned by the Minneapolis Tribune Publishing Company. Read More...

Manistique Water Tower And The Efforts To Save It

The historic water tower was built in 1921 and 1922 by a local contractor Fridolph Danielson.  A native of Sweden, Danielson came to Manistique in 1897.

The historic water tower was built in 1921 and 1922 by a local contractor Fridolph Danielson. A native of Sweden, Danielson came to Manistique in 1897.

From 1922 to 1966, the historic water tower and pumping station served Manistique. The new pumping station station was located at Intake Park. With some renovations, the water tower became the home of the Manistique Hall of Justice from 1966 to 1968.

In 1968, the Chamber of Commerce installed a circular drive around the tower and made it their home for only a couple of years. The tower began its down-hill slide with a leaky roof and episodes of vandalism.

The first effort to get it names to the National Register of Historic Building’s began in 1979. It was names to the state register of historic sites in 1980. Read More...