The 1920’s KKK – A Legacy of Intolerance

The film “The Birth of a Nation” led to a resurgence of the KKK in 1920’s America. Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

     The racist organization known as the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan mounted a resurgence in the 1920’s following the Hollywood release of D. W. Griffiths classic silent film, “The Birth of a Nation.” The widely popular movie reinforced negative racial stereotypes concerning blacks and portrayed Klan members as heroic. The film’s unparalleled success reflected the prejudices then held by a large portion of the American population.

     The Klan first arrived in Detroit in 1921, but the organization quickly spread to Michigan’s northern rural counties. Ku Klux Klan organizers came to Manistique during the early summer of 1923. Four men posing as researchers from the “Sebring Research Bureau” circulated among the population. It soon became known that the group was attempting to organize a branch of the Ku Klux Klan in Manistique. Read More...

WWI Memorial Dedication – Aug. 13, 1922

The World War Memorial at its present location on the courthouse grounds

          The dedication of the World War I soldiers’ memorial took place on Sunday, August 13, 1922. The memorial stone replaced a temporary monument which had been erected at the intersection of Elk and River Streets in 1919.

          The granite obelisk was ordered from New Hampshire at a cost of $2000, with $1000 being appropriated by the county and $750 being donated by the city of Manistique. The remaining $250 was raised by the Manistique Women’s Club through small donations given by local citizens. Read More...