The Manistique & Lake Superior R.R. – The Haywire Line

Engine No. 12, March 1932 Image. This locomotive was later renumbered 2370 and was destroyed in the roundhouse fire of 1952.  It was scrapped in 1953. (Niles/Helmka Family Collection)

Engine No. 12, March 1932 Image. This locomotive was later renumbered 2370 and was destroyed in the roundhouse fire of 1952. It was scrapped in 1953. (Niles/Helmka Family Collection)

Early History

            Construction of the railroad line between South Manistique and Shingleton was completed in 1898 and was then known as the Manistique and Northwestern Railroad (M&NW). Passenger service from Manistique to Shingleton began on January 1, 1899 with a one-way fare costing $1.35. In 1902 the line became part of a new railroad known as the Manistique, Marquette and Northern (MM&N) offering passenger service between Manistique and Marquette. During 1907, the company relocated the railroad’s roundhouse and shop buildings from South Manistique to Manistique north of its Deer Street depot and offices. The company was reorganized yet another time in July of 1908 and briefly became known as the Manistique & Northern Railroad (M & N). Read More...

Pioneer Merchant – John A. Falk

The John A. Falk Hardware Store was located in the former Weston Lumber Co. General Store building on the north side of Deer Street between Weston and New Delta Ave.

The John A. Falk Hardware Store was located in the former Weston Lumber Co. General Store building on the north side of Deer Street between Weston and New Delta Ave.

             John A. Falk was born on a farm in Dalsand, Sweden, on February 6, 1864; the son of Andrew Johnson Falk and Maja Lisa Eriksdotter. John grew up in a family of ten children and attended school in his home village of Grinstad.  A family crisis occurred when John was 15 years old which changed his life forever. His father encountered severe financial reverses including the loss of the family farm. John and his siblings, who were old enough to work, were forced to fend for themselves. Read More...

The Flood Of 1920-Palm Sunday

The Flood Of 1920-Palm Sunday (March 28th, 1920) Manistique, MI-The most catastrophic event to occur in Manistique other than the fire of 1883 was the flood of 1920. Floodwaters began pouring over the flume walls in the early morning of Palm Sunday, March 28, 1920. The immediate cause of the flood was an ice jam on the Driggs River that backed the river up. When the jam broke, the water and logs in the river rushed into the Manistique River. Since the winter had an exceptional snowfall along with warmer than normal temperatures and several days of rain, the rivers draining into the Manistique River were already swollen. With the torrent of water, a west bank wall broke, causing water to rush over the flume walls and into the west side of Manistique all the way down Deer Street and Chippewa Avenue. Read More...