WWI Memorial Dedication – Aug. 13, 1922

The World War Memorial at its present location on the courthouse grounds

          The dedication of the World War I soldiers’ memorial took place on Sunday, August 13, 1922. The memorial stone replaced a temporary monument which had been erected at the intersection of Elk and River Streets in 1919.

          The granite obelisk was ordered from New Hampshire at a cost of $2000, with $1000 being appropriated by the county and $750 being donated by the city of Manistique. The remaining $250 was raised by the Manistique Women’s Club through small donations given by local citizens. Read More...

Decoration Day Celebration – May 30, 1885

The above is a rare photo of Manistique’s Civil War veterans getting ready for a patriotic holiday celebration. Pictured from far right: John Gayar, Henry Brassel, Amos Hill, George W. Rice  (partially hidden behind Hill) and Wright E. Clarke (buttoning coat), On the far left, the men with insignias on their hats are David Blair (left) and William Wood (Right).

The above is a rare photo of Manistique’s Civil War veterans getting ready for a patriotic holiday celebration. Pictured from far right: John Gayar, Henry Brassel, Amos Hill, George W. Rice (partially hidden behind Hill) and Wright E. Clarke (buttoning coat), On the far left, the men with insignias on their hats are David Blair (left) and William Wood (Right).

Decoration Day – 1885 

            Manistique’s first celebration of what was then known as Decoration Day, took place on Sunday, May 30, 1885. The citizens of the town were stirred from their sleep at the rude hour of 3:00 A.M. by the ringing of hammers and anvils announcing Decoration morn. In the forenoon the streets became crowded with horse drawn wagons and carriages, as pioneers from the country arrived to celebrate the holiday. By noon, the stirring martial music of the Cornet brass band was heard echoing down the avenues. Read More...

Manistique’s Civil War Cannon

The Civil War Cannon on the Court House Lawn - 1915 Image

The Civil War Cannon on the Court House Lawn – 1915 Image

             In 1896, the United States Navy Department donated a Civil War era cannon to Manistique’s George F. Fuller Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. The cannon had seen service on the James River in Virginia during the years 1861-65. After it arrived in Manistique, the cannon was placed on the Courthouse grounds where it soon became an honored emblem of national pride. The cannon played an important role in the life of the community. It was paraded through the streets of the city on Decoration Day and on the Fourth of July.  Its thunderous boom could be heard on National holidays and on extraordinary occasions, such as at the death of President McKinley in 1901, when the Presidential Salute was given. It took two men to fire the cannon, and the duty fell to Civil War Veterans, Henry Brassel and John Gayar. Read More...