WWI Remembrance – The Perilous Atlantic

     On February 5, 1918, the sinking of the troop transport ship SS Tuscania sent shock waves across the nation, including the town of Manistique. The Tuscania was a former luxury passenger liner that had been pressed into service as a troop carrier by the United States Army.  The Tuscania had sailed from Hoboken, New Jersey on January 24, 1918 with 2,013 soldiers and 383 crewmen on board. Despite being escorted by a British convey, the Tuscania was struck by a torpedo fired from a German submarine, and sent to the bottom of the Irish Sea. The vast majority of the troops aboard the Tuscania were rescued by the Royal Navy Destroyers Mosquito and Pigeon, but 210 souls were lost, including both military personnel and crewmen.

Read More...

1890’s – The Flat Iron Block (Pearl Street, Water Street, and Maine Streets), and the Notorious Saloon Owner Daniel Heffron

 The Chicago Lumber Company started around 1865 by two gentlemen by the names of Mr. Spinney and Mr. Boyd. Through the many years the Chicago Lumber Company owned most of Schoolcraft County and is responsible for the major development of Epsport (Manistique). During this time they started the Chicago Lumber Company Store.  A social gathering in front of the old C. L. Co. dock warehouse. Upper from left are: Chas. B. Mersereau, Capt. Woodruff of Steamer Canisteo, Dick Cleve, and James Norton. Lower: Duane Leonard, Geo. Ruby, Capt. McWilliams, Cal Bingham with straw-hat, and "Pincky" Miller with cady, supposed to be a detective during a 'wet" and "dry" campaign.

The Chicago Lumber Company started around 1865 by two gentlemen by the names of Mr. Spinney and Mr. Boyd. Through the many years the Chicago Lumber Company owned most of Schoolcraft County and is responsible for the major development of Epsport (Manistique). During this time they started the Chicago Lumber Company Store. A social gathering in front of the old C. L. Co. dock warehouse. Upper from left are: Chas. B. Mersereau, Capt. Woodruff of Steamer Canisteo, Dick Cleve, and James Norton. Lower: Duane Leonard, Geo. Ruby, Capt. McWilliams, Cal Bingham with straw-hat, and “Pincky” Miller with cady, supposed to be a detective during a ‘wet” and “dry” campaign.

When the Chicago Lumber Company came to Manistique in 1872, they owned all of the town area except one residence. Their goal was to keep the town “dry”. Any property leased or later sold had a convenant attached to it saying that the premises could not manufacture, store or sell intoxicating liquors.

The residence referred to above was owned by Alex Richards. The location was bounded by Pearl Street, Water Street, and Maine Street, forming the a flatiron shape. The only liquor available was through whiskey boats that would anchor offshore. The whiskey sellers were finally arrested as a result of selling their goods to the Indians. In the 1880’s, Daniel Heffron from New York saw great opportunity in Manistique as a saloon-keeper. He found Richards, bought his property and built his saloon.

Read More...